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Reed Hair News

Did you know that Reed Hair Specialise in Afro Caribbean Hair?

July 28, 2017

Well, not a lot of people do!

In fact we have looked after black ladies for many years now. Our view is why do people with ethnic hair have to visit specialists salons? Hairs hair, isnt it??? Of course our stylists have been highly trained in the afro hair department and our products are second to none! As our most popular services are RELAXERS I thought Id give you an insight on how relaxers work on afro hair.

After reading through our favorite magazine www.blackhairmagazine.com  I came  across this great blog by @healthyandrelaxed. Its a perfect piece on advising the do’s and dont’s on relaxing hair…. thought I’d share it with you ………

RELAXED HAIR CASE STUDY

I was contacted by a fellow reader for hair advice. Let’s call her Amy. Amy provided a detailed hair story and I have decided to make it into a post as I believe it will help other readers.

Summary

Amy decided to go natural because her relaxed hair was damaged, so she big chopped. At first, she loved it, but soon realised that her 4c texture required more maintenance and didn’t give her the ‘desired look’ which made her self-conscious. Months later, she self-relaxed but didn’t attain the desired results. She corrective relaxed, and did a mini chop to improve the look. She was about 8 months post relaxer when she reached out. Her ends are thinning out and she is experiencing breakage on her hairline.

Overall, she wants thick, healthy hair regardless of the state (i.e.: relaxed or natural) and was contemplating whether to go natural or continue relaxing.

Response

Reading the story, 3 key things stuck out to me:

  1. Amy has 4c hair and she prefers straight hairstyles

Amy repeatedly hinted preference for straight hair throughout her story. Though she initially fell in love with her 4c natural hair, she became self-conscious of her texture as it made her “look like a boy”

I commend her for identifying her texture and for reaching out. There is so much politics surrounding black hair, but my stance is that you should do what works best for you. If you prefer straight hairstyles, then stay relaxed, as it is damaging to continually apply heat (i.e. blowout) to natural hair to achieve straight styles.

There is nothing wrong with preferring straight hairstyles to natural hair, but if you lose your confidence when your hair is not in a desired state, then there is clearly an issue. Your self-worth should never be attached to your hair.

4c hair is not meant to be straight. It coils tightly and shrinks to about 75% of its length. The only way to have ‘straight’ 4c hair is via a chemical treatment or a blowout. So, Amy, I suggest staying relaxed.

  1. Amy Prefers Low Maintenance (LM) Styles

Amy should steer clear of weaves, as she applies too much heat to ‘blend’ her weave out, which defeats the purpose of the style. Her front hair is ‘growing much slower’ because it is damaged from daily heat usage, which is a ‘no-no’ for hair. Also, note that a weave does not have the same texture as your hair, so it will not ‘blend’ seamlessly.

If you prefer LM styles, then you are better off staying relaxed. Relaxed hair may require less maintenance than natural tresses, but it is not an excuse for negligence. You must have a hair regimen that you consistently and diligently follow. I suggest styles such as braids and weaves. I highly recommend Ghana braids, as it has tremendously helped me achieve thicker hair.

  1. Amy wants thick, healthy hair and has no preference for the state (i.e.: natural or relaxed)

Thick hair has its pros and cons. The most notable pro is that hair looks amazing when styled, as it produces luscious curls.

The biggest con is that it is quite overwhelming to maintain and style, as there is so much hair! The most difficult part of styling my hair is my new growth. I have to be patient and gentle, as they are so thick and strong. I have to comb them gently to prevent breakage. #thestruggleisreal

If your goal is voluminous hair, then you must pick a hair state and stick to it. Thick hair will take time as it needs to adjust to your regimen. Jumping back and forth between #naturalhair and #relaxedhair is not good. Hair needs stability to reach its full (no pun intended) potential.

never, (EVER) go beyond 16 weeks without relaxer until you have a solid grasp of healthy hair care.

Make sure you have consistently followed your regimen for at least a year before attempting a longer stretch, or transitioning to natural hair. For transitioners, I suggest reading “The Science of Transitioning Hair” by Audrey Davis Sivasothy, the author of The Science of Black Hair.

Finally, I highly recommend a professional stylist for relaxer touch ups since they have the right products to relax and style your hair properly. If you self-relax and are never happy with the result or you experience relaxer burn, please see a stylist!

Final Note

So Amy, below are my 3 recommendations to you:

  1. Stay relaxed
  2. Never stretch your relaxer for more than 16 weeks
  3. Follow a hair regimen consistently

 

Uncategorised

“Can I have blusher in my hair please?” Why we’re talking ‘make-up’ for our hair now

May 30, 2017

It started with Kim Kardashian, as so many of today’s trends do. A snap of her face sporting unblended contouring shared on social media sent Twitter and Instagram into meltdown. It suddenly brought a make-up artist’s secret – tailoring a variety of shades to help, for example, slim a nose or accentuate cheekbones – to our attention. And we couldn’t get enough!

Of course, hair colourists were already creating bespoke shades in the salon, but this gave us a chance to talk  in a way that would help you  better understand what overall effect a certain hair colour technique or placement would have. Genius!

Colour is simply make-up for the hair. Explaining new colour techniques by using make-up as an example is a great way of explaining colour placement.

The surge of people using make-up to change not only the tones of their skin but also sculpt their face shape has meant that clients are much more aware that colour isn’t just about your shade choice but about placement, and how it can massively alter the shape of your hair cut. The normal go-to solution would be to change their cut or styling product. Now with the power of contouring with hair colour, just like you would with make-up, you can give the illusion of structure and form. With clever light and shadow colour placement, you can make it appear hair has more volume.


CONTOURING

This is a clever way to help make your face appear more defined and features more accentuated, as illustrated by Kim K on the Instas. Contouring can be translated onto hair easily, it follows similar lines, using colour to draw attention to certain areas of the hair. Using light and dark tones in the right places can really change the shape of someone’s face and in this way the same principles apply to hair as you would with make-up.


STROBING

Similar to contouring, strobing highlights where the light would naturally hit the face. This means you can accentuate your best features, and complement those we’re, um, well less keen on with contrasting colours, all with a shimmery, light-catching halo. Sounds divine! Strobing works alongside contouring and would mainly be offered for more of the natural look.

 


THE ‘NO MAKE-UP’ MAKE-UP

This is the anti-contouring beauty trend, a look that whispers: “I’ve spent two minutes getting ready, life’s more important!” but in reality has taken an age to perfect that natural finish. Well, for hair, it’s all about the nude beige, strongly inspired by the invisible make-up trend.  This shade is midway between ashy blonde and platinum blonde, offers subtle highlights and super-shiny results. Nude blonde is an easy look for you to wear, leaving your hair with an effortless glow.

 

 


BLUSH

 

Most often in pink and peach, blush is used to create a radiant glow, while also amplifying your facial structure or even correcting your face shape. Rose Blush uses exactly the terminology of make-up. You’ll see in your mind’s eye the sort of colour and it gives a sense of enhancing and subtlety.  Like a blush powder, this technique lights up the face, and is inspired by make-up layering.

It enhances shine without the need for any radical transformation. With pinker tones becoming the new ‘neutrals’, no one is being stared at in the street for these looks anymore. What is ‘the norm’ has shifted. Pastels have become classic, no longer a micro-trend, but the concept of using the tones found in blushers is a fast-growing trend.


SMOKEY EYE

This is the idea of blending colours to avoid harsh lines (and root regrowth) that’s really catching on. A smokey eye in our words would be a root smudge. It can be noticeable or very subtle. It can give you the rock chick look or you can use more natural colours.

Want make-up magic for your hair? This is what you need to do…

  • To enhance eyes… opt for the darkest colour shades on the under layers of a fringe. This helps make the line look stronger just above the eyes, which in turn makes their colour pop more.
  • To enhance cheekbones… ask your colourist to extend the colour with sectioning so the darker shades sit down near the top of the cheekbone.
  • To bring wide eyes closer together… colour should be extended down the sides, so darker shades sit at eye level.
  • To elongate a round face… ask your hairdresser to lighten the top of your hair and the ends using a freehand technique. To shadow the sides of the face, they need to use a darker shade to add depth.
  • To soften a triangular face…  Go for a darker shades at the top of the head and crown areas then ask for lighter pieces through the mid-lengths and ends to lighten under your jawline.
  • To widen facial features… keep your roots and the underneath of your hair dark to create shadow at the top of your head and around your jawline. Ask your colourist to apply a single highlight around your face to frame it and weave lighter pieces in front of your ears.

Courtesy of layered Online